Archivo de la etiqueta: Lithops

It’s Fiesta time for this one

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis little Lithops dinteri shows its best outfit for the famous Feria de Abril: lunares – the striking  polka dot pattern of the flamenco dresses.

Lithops dinteriAnd six weeks later, still as nice. Slowly growing bigger though.
dinteri dots 3Still growing strong in september 2014.

dinterii 4: moult
Fourteen months old now. Preparing for it’s second moult. Will it keep its vivid colouring?

dinteri 5: new body
Less dots, and a complete fissure. A nearly adult Lithops.

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How big is big?

¿Qué tamaño tiene un guisante?

How big is big?

Take your time: How big is a pea? Be honest now, before you count the millimeter  divisions, how big would you guess is a pea? And is a pea bigger or lesser than a one year old Lithops?

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                 Problem solved! The average green garden pea is 9mm.            I’d have given it far less than nearly 1 cm!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis little fellow – Lithops karasmontana ‘Top Red’ –  is 18 month old.

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And this is Lithops hookeri ssp. subfenestrata ‘brunneoviolacea’. Five month old.

pseudotruncatella groendrayensis

Two and a half years old: Lithops pseudotruncatella ssp. groendrayensis

lesliei venteri maraisi

 Both Lithops lesliei ssp. venteri ‘Maraisi’ , sown November 2013, are now  five months old.

verruculosae inae

And the jewel loaded Lithops verruculosa var. verruculosae ‘Inae’  is a year and a half.

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I ignore how old these four may  be, as they flowered last autumn,    they are adults altogether :  Lithops lesliei ‘Albinica’.

pseudotruncatella aplina

These three – you spot them? – are 5 month old.  Lithops pseudotruncatella ‘alpina’.

Well then. Let’s see if a pea is a good criterion for the size of Lithops. Here we go:

karamontana and peahookeri and peagroendray and peamaraisii and peainae and peaYou  already imagine how  it  will look like for the tiny pseudotruncatella, don’t you?albinica and peapseudotruncatella and peaFive 6 months old Lithops pseudotruncatella ‘alpina’ C068 together are smaller than a 0,9cm pea.

These plants have germinated in full sun at 28º N latitude (which is pretty near to their S latitude procedence btw) and they have all the pigments they need for protection. What they (still) don’t have is a volumen that helps them to survive in dry and hot atmospheric conditions. Make the experiment: place a pea in the sun and watch.

You won’t have to wait long!

So, please, in summer and whenever it is hot and dry – bury your little treasures or give them shade.

Ω

Orange

One never knows how a little Lithops may look after hatching.  For it is a hatch when the cotyledon slowly dries up and just a papery shell reminds you of the first stage of the little Lithops‘ life. While the window in the cotyledon opens, you get a first idea of the colour the primary pair of true leaves will show. And if you are lucky, there will be a little jewel growing.

While most of the adult Lithops have a distinct pattern, the youngsters may play on the gay side. This one seems to mimick with a little peace of seramis!

Lithops bromfieldii and friendsHere you see three 85 day old Lithops seedlings, L. bromfieldii and L. lesliei.

Lithops bromfieldii

The same little L. bromfieldii a fortnight later. The empty seed still strongly attached to the completely dry cotyledon.

see the colour?

You see the colour? This makes a lithops-grower feel happy!

orange it is!

This is my awesome little orange Lithops bromfieldii – 122 days old and 0,8cm ‘big’. –  Lets see how the colour changes with time and with the next pair of leaves.

one year in the life of a living stone

Lithops optica rubra eneroLithops optica ‘Rubra’  C81 A,    January 2014

febrero

Lithops optica ‘Rubra’  C81 A,    February 2014

marzo

Lithops optica ‘Rubra’  C81 A,    March 2014

abril

Lithops optica ‘Rubra’  C81 A,    April 2014

Lithops rubroa mayo 14Lithops optica ‘Rubra’ C81A,  May 2014

L. optica 'Rubra' junioLithops optica ‘Rubra’ C81A, June 2014

optica rubra 8Lithops optica ‘Rubra’  C81A, August 2014

one year optica  8

And the year ended in August 2014 for all  Lithops optica ‘Rubra’.
Though in shadow, the heat from above and the isopods from
beneath did their work. The gardener helped, too, with a drink or two. It was quick, four days, and all that was left was dry and empty.

 

Lithops dorotheae

Lithops dorotheae C300 17 days oldLittle tiny weeds they are! Sown last day of december 2013, the first Lithops dorotheae C300 germinated  two weeks later finding their way between big boulders of volcanic gravel. Still so green and delicate.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOne month old, there is some colour now.

Lithops dorotheae 91 daysThree month old, barrel shaped, purple-grey cotyledons.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERANearly four months, the first hatchling has appeared. Nice markings.

dorotheae 6Six months now, most hatchlings still keep their sun protection. Many have succumbed to  summer dryness, from some twentyandsomething there still are living fourteen.  At this stage they look very alike to seedlings of L. dinteri,  so it is a good advice to keep them apart when sowing.