Archivo de la etiqueta: alpina

Green II

Green cultivars among Lithops are not rare. And usually I’m not fond of them. Perceptions change dramatically when one of the green ones appears in one’s own sowing tray. Now that there is what seems to be a first green pseudotruncatella,   I am very proud. pseudotruncatella green 1And obviously, it has been a tough struggle to get rid of it’s first true pair of leaves. The first pair, already greenish, but not very differrent from the rest of pseudotruncatellas, had been swelling for weeks, from a very tiny body to a nearly one cm ‘blob’. No signs whatsoever of a fissure, and the uplifted body still is perfectly turgent. Then, behind a little stone, there it sat – a complete solid green Lithops pseudotruncatella. So, let’s keep fingers crossed, for there is still a long way to adulthood for this little green cultivar. If it really is one, for after the next molt it could turn back to the usual colour.
pseudotruncatella green 2The ‘normal’ coloured pseudotruncatelllas from the same batch are stronger and display the well known patterns of this species.

pseudotruncablablabla green
No trace of reds or browns – solid green as far as I can tell. But before naming it, I’ll wait what happens after the next two molts. Photographed with 1/64 of additional flash to tease out any possible colour.
green pseudo 4Three days later there is still no red pigmentation. I added some black sand, for the exposed neck didn’t look right.

green and gay pseudotruncatella 5

pseudotruncatella 6
No trace of green Lithops left after changing leaves. Still one of the tiny pseudotruncatellas, but one of the most beautifully coloured.

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How big is big?

¿Qué tamaño tiene un guisante?

How big is big?

Take your time: How big is a pea? Be honest now, before you count the millimeter  divisions, how big would you guess is a pea? And is a pea bigger or lesser than a one year old Lithops?

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                 Problem solved! The average green garden pea is 9mm.            I’d have given it far less than nearly 1 cm!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis little fellow – Lithops karasmontana ‘Top Red’ –  is 18 month old.

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And this is Lithops hookeri ssp. subfenestrata ‘brunneoviolacea’. Five month old.

pseudotruncatella groendrayensis

Two and a half years old: Lithops pseudotruncatella ssp. groendrayensis

lesliei venteri maraisi

 Both Lithops lesliei ssp. venteri ‘Maraisi’ , sown November 2013, are now  five months old.

verruculosae inae

And the jewel loaded Lithops verruculosa var. verruculosae ‘Inae’  is a year and a half.

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I ignore how old these four may  be, as they flowered last autumn,    they are adults altogether :  Lithops lesliei ‘Albinica’.

pseudotruncatella aplina

These three – you spot them? – are 5 month old.  Lithops pseudotruncatella ‘alpina’.

Well then. Let’s see if a pea is a good criterion for the size of Lithops. Here we go:

karamontana and peahookeri and peagroendray and peamaraisii and peainae and peaYou  already imagine how  it  will look like for the tiny pseudotruncatella, don’t you?albinica and peapseudotruncatella and peaFive 6 months old Lithops pseudotruncatella ‘alpina’ C068 together are smaller than a 0,9cm pea.

These plants have germinated in full sun at 28º N latitude (which is pretty near to their S latitude procedence btw) and they have all the pigments they need for protection. What they (still) don’t have is a volumen that helps them to survive in dry and hot atmospheric conditions. Make the experiment: place a pea in the sun and watch.

You won’t have to wait long!

So, please, in summer and whenever it is hot and dry – bury your little treasures or give them shade.

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